Home Projects

  • We had decided before Christmas that we wanted to install a water filter that would help reduce/eliminate the heavy chlorine that would often be in our water.  The thought process started with a simple shower-head chlorine filter; but it wasn't too hard to think of other water to filter... so the whole-house filter was the cheaper and biggest bang option.

    The entire project cost was under $215 (not counting my dads consumables like flux, solder, etc...):

    • Princess Auto - Filter housing, chlorine/sediment filter, mounting bracket, pipe cleaner, and shut-off valves ~$172
    • Canadian Tire - copper pipe, caps, elbows, and Tee ~$23
    • Home Depot - 1" to 1/2" reducers (between filter and pipe) and wood to mount the filter on ~$18
    The Before:
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    The After (1 of 2):
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    The After (2 of 2):
    837bb863cba7ef7938086b82282b9d38.jpg 

    I certainly won't miss the chlorine smell, and I'm really looking forward too chemical free water for showers/baths, cooking, boiling water for tea, etc...

    Special thanks to my dad for supplying the majority of the know-how, tools, training, and labour!

  • f508f49c9abb8803b5e19b79423a08ee.JPG

    Last night, our kitchen hot water tap started misbehaving and wouldn't turn off completely without really wrenching it.  By morning, wrenching it didn't work, and we resorted to using the shut-off under the sink.  After about three used of the shut-off to control the water, it stopped functioning... leaving us to control the shut-off on the hot water tank.  Almost immediately, I noticed the hot-water valve on the tank would leak a bit in certain positions, and decided using the shut-offs I installed around our whole-house chlorine filter would be my best bet.

    The plumbing representative at Home Depot was excellent.  He put a copper pipe cutter in my hand (to remove the bad shut-off), a new shut-off that would basically crimp onto the copper pipe, and gave me a walk through on how to install it and what parts to not use (connecting it to the existing flex-hose).  We then grabbed some teflon tape and picked out our new taps... which were made by the same company as our old ones and almost identical in style (I guess we really liked it).

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